Advice

A Quick Guide on Preventing Sickness in your Baby

Preventing sickness with your Child

 

My child was born during the harsh month of January, between two blizzards. I suffered a mild case of fever, but at least it was easy to keep her in for those couple of months, away from the unwelcoming germs I just knew were lurking outside my door. I was just right to be more concern as Infants do not need antibodies to fight off the colds and infections – making them more likely not to be sick but to stay away from the fever for a longer period of time.

In the first year of the newborn about 10-12 infections are common which lasts for around one week.

So what’s a mom to do? A lot! Put these germ-fighting habits into play and you could help your sweetie dodge an illness this winter or at least make those sick days more bearable for both of you.

How to prevent cold in babies

Until your baby is 2 months old, mothers need to take special care and cautious in order to avoid the child from the big crowds. There are some of the ways by which you can prevent your child from getting sick.

Keep the baby close

When you do the venture out, stay at least six feet from anyone who is coughing or sneezing and where your baby is next to you. Strangers are less likely to touch your baby’s hands and face when she’s attached to you. If she’s in a stroller, keep the canopy down, and cover it with a light blanket.

Mind the company

Everyone in the family wants to meet the new arrival, but you need to be cautious as anyone who has been sick or fever should not hold the baby for at least 24 hours and also allow the kids not to kiss the child on the face or be around the baby for too long. Babies are very susceptible to catching illnesses.

Keep cleanliness up

There are lots and lots of germs on your hand. And every time you come in from a public place, use the bathroom, eat or change the diaper, scrub your hands for 20 seconds before touching the baby.

Keep nursing.

Serious colds and ear and throat infections are reduced by 63 percent in infants who breastfeed exclusively for six months, studies show. Babies who nurse are also much less likely to come down with respiratory tract infections and stomach bugs.

Disinfect surfaces.

Germs can live for days and days on things like shopping carts, so keep a package of sanitizing wipes in your diaper bag. Disinfecting everyday items can do wonders for preventing sicknesses.

Don’t delay any vaccines

Following the vaccine schedule is very important to prevent the illness like chicken pox, measles as we do not want our child to get ill. Vaccines are very important as they do their job. Some parents think that too many shots are not safe, the answer is NO. Giving too many shots is also necessary to reduce the risks of seriously illnesses.

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